What To Do When Moving with Your Dog

What To Do When Moving with Your Dog

So You’re A Dog Owner, and You’re Moving

Moving can be incredibly stressful on its own. It’s not only a physical process but also a mental and emotional one. Then with a dog or multiple dogs added to the mix, the whole ordeal can be overwhelming

Thankfully, you can take specific steps to make a move easier for both you and your furry friend(s). To avoid confusing or upsetting your pup(s) during a move, follow Dope Dog’s guide, so you have one less thing to worry about during this stressful time. 

Preparations 

Before you load your dog(s) into the car and whisk them away to your new place, you need to conduct a little research. First, look up the contact information for the nearby veterinary hospital. Then, in case of an emergency, you will have the number and address ready to go. 

Have the technicalities sorted before you arrive. 

If you’re switching primary care vets, you should transfer all of your dog’s medical records to the new hospital. If you are lost finding a new veterinarian, your previous vet should be more than happy to provide you with a referral.

It might also be helpful to look up nearby dog parks or other areas where you can take the dogs if you don’t have much yard space. Then if they need to get out any energy or go potty while you’re moving, you already have a location in mind so they don’t grow more agitated. 

For The Actual Move 

Now it’s game time. You’re ready to pick up your precious cargo and bring your dog(s) into the new house. First things first, if your dog(s) has anxiety during car rides, follow these tips to help them cope and calm down. You can also give them CBD treats before the ride so that they’re feeling even more zen.  

Related Link: Dope Dog’s CBD Treats and Oils 

Dog treats scattered on a pink background.

Comfort is key. 

Make sure that when you’re loading up the car, you pack your dog’s comfort items nearby. Taking this step can help with any car anxiety, plus you will want to put their favorite toys or bed in the house right away to help them adjust. 

In a new place, chew toys, blankets, and their food and water bowls can make everything feel familiar for the dog(s). An empty house isn’t inviting to anyone, especially a clueless dog who doesn’t know where they are. Give them a set-up like they had at your previous residence and let them settle in. 

If you have movers or other people going in and out of your house, you might want to barricade the dog(s) somewhere with their comfort items if you’re worried about them running out. Along the same lines, make sure they’re sporting their collar with proper identification just in case. 

Be prepared for things to get a little messy. 

Dogs are situational learners. Even if they were perfectly potty trained in your previous residence, they might unlearn these behaviors in a new, unfamiliar setting. Remember to be patient and try to refresh them on their skills with positive reinforcement training. Grab a treat, and think of it as a way to unwind during the move. They’ll get their zoomies out, and you get a mental break. Everybody wins! 

Related Link: Training with Positive Reinforcement 

Check Your Yard’s Safety 

Before you let your dog(s) off the leash to explore, double-check that everything is secure if you have a backyard. The gates should be closed, and any sharp objects should be picked up and thrown away. 

You can’t be too safe.  

The first time you let your dog into your yard put them on a leash. If your dog finds something they shouldn’t, you’ll be right there to get rid of it. For example, if there’s a hole in the fence, then you can make a mental note and fix it later on without risking your dog running through it. 

 Next, Socialize Your Dog(s) 

If your new place is noisier or otherwise a different environment than your previous home, you might need to train them further to adjust. For example, if you’re now on a busy street and your dog barks at people walking by, reward them for quiet behavior. 

Or perhaps they’re not used to having a window that shows them the squirrels or rabbits outside. This new distraction can agitate them, but try to distract them with treats or toys if it does. You can also put their bed or comfort items away from the windows if this becomes too much. Hopefully, they will be more drawn to their fun stuffed animals than the critters that live outside your home.

Related Link: How To Stop A Dog Barking When Left Alone 

A big, white dog is lying on an unmade bed.

Enjoy your new space with your furry friend(s) 

Now, you get to take a break. After following each of these steps to help your dog(s) acclimate to their new living situation, they should be managing quite well with the change.

They can now explore, make new friends with your neighbor’s dogs, and even claim a favorite spot in the house. 

All in all, your dog should be just fine both during and after a move as long as you are patient and considerate with them. If they aren’t acclimating then you can bring them to your new veterinarian for extra guidance. If they suggest CBD products to help with your dog’s anxiety levels, try out Dope Dog’s CBD Treats and Oils. They’re Oprah’s favorite after all! 

 As a thank you, we’re giving out free gifts to customers who purchase month-long subscription boxes!

Comments 0

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published